Rabies is a rare but serious disease of the nervous system, generally transmitted in spit from a sting by a contaminated, rabid animal, normally a dog. Rabies can be prevented by a vaccine, which is advocated for individuals working with animals in high risk regions. All travellers in these places should avoid contact with stray animals.

What Are The Symptoms?

An infected individual may develop symptoms within 10 days to 2 months of a sting, although seldom the virus can lie dormant for several years. Rabies generally begins with flu-like symptoms that last for about 2—7 days, followed by:

  • paralysis of the face and throat muscles
  • extreme thirst
  • painful throat spasms resulting in an inability to beverage and a anxiety about water
  • disorientation and agitation
  • loss of consciousness
  • paralysis of the limbs.

Once symptoms have developed the illness is generally lethal.

What Might Be Done?

There’s no treatment once the symptoms have grown. Analysis may not be apparent from the symptoms, and blood and saliva tests are generally done to support the existence of the virus.